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Tax Due Dates

Tax Rates

We're here to help you resolve your tax problems and put an end to the confusion that the IRS can put you through.

Make sure your calendar is up-to-date with these important deadlines, dates, possible extensions and other factors in play for both individuals and business in 2023.

 
 

February 2023

February 15

Individual Filers - Reclaim your exemption from withholding

If you chose to claim an exemption from your employer withholding taxes from your paycheck last year by filing a Form W-4, you’ll need to re-file the form by this date. You would file this exemption request if you anticipate having no tax liability this year and had none in the previous year.

March 2023

March 15

Business - Taxes are due for some business types (partnerships, multi-member LLCs, and S-Corporations)

Businesses organized as partnerships, including multi-member LLCs, and S-Corporations need to file Form 1065, or 1120S by March 15, 2023, if they are a calendar year business. If your business uses a fiscal year, you need to file your tax return by the 15th day of the third month following the close of your tax year. For example, if your business uses an April 1 - March 31 tax year, your business tax return would be due June 15 instead of March 15.

April 2023

April 3

Individual Filers - Required minimum distribution due if you turned 72 in 2022

If you turned 72 in 2022, you have until April 3, 2023 to take your 2022 required minimum distribution (your first required distribution) from your retirement account. After passage of the SECURE Act in 2019, if you turned 70 years old on or after July 1, 2019, you don’t need to take RMDs until you reach age 72.

April 18

Individual Filers - Deadline to File Form 4868 and request an extension

The tax day deadline is also the last day to file Form 4868 requesting an extension to file your individual income tax return. If you won’t be ready to file your tax return by tax day, make sure you instead complete an extension request, granting you the ability to delay filing a completed return until October 16, 2023. But remember, even if you choose to file an extension, you are still required to pay any taxes you may owe by the April deadline.

April 18

Individual Filers - Deadline to make IRA and HSA contributions for 2022 tax year

For individual income tax return filers, this also marks the final day to make contributions to your IRA or HSA for the 2022 tax year. After this date, you generally can’t make contributions for the previous tax year.

April 18

Making estimated tax payments means that you need to estimate how much income you’re likely to make for the year and determine how much you will owe to the IRS for income taxes. You can use IRS Form 1040-ES to calculate how much tax liability you'll have for the year. IRS Publication 505 contains all the rules and details you might need to know about how to calculate this amount. If you overestimated how much tax liability you’d owe for a year and are due a refund, you can choose to receive that money now or apply the overage to the following year’s quarterly tax payments.

April 18

Business - Taxes for C-Corporations are due

Businesses organized as C-Corporations need to file form 1120 by April 18, 2023, if they are a calendar year business. If your business uses a fiscal year, you need to file your tax return by the 15th day of the third month following the close of your tax year. For example, if your business uses an April 1 - March 31 tax year, your business tax return would be due June 15 instead of in April.

April 18

Individual Filers - Tax day (unless extended due to local state holiday)

The tax deadline typically falls on April 15 each year, but can be delayed if it falls on a weekend or holiday. Missing the tax deadline can have consequences like penalties and interest.

June 2023

June 15

Individual Filers - Second quarter 2023 estimated tax payment due

Despite the IRS referring to these payments as quarterly estimated taxes, the due dates don’t necessarily fall within “quarters” nor do they each represent three months of tax payments. They represent an equal quarterly share of your estimated income tax liability paid at uneven intervals. The first payment occurs 3 and a half months into the year. The second payment is five and a half months; the third payment is eight and a half months, and the fourth payment is due 12 and a half months after the year starts.

September 2023

September 15

Business - Deadline for extended partnership and S-corporation returns

September 15

Individual Filers - Third quarter 2023 estimated tax payment due

Third quarter 2023 estimated tax payment due

October 2023

October 16

Business - Deadline for extended C-corporation returns

October 16

Individual Filers - Deadline to file your extended 2022 tax return

If you chose to file an extension request on your tax return, this is the due date for filing your tax return.

December 2023

December 31

Individual Filers - Required minimum distributions must be taken for individuals age 73 or older by the end of 2023

After taking your first RMD (for 2022) by April 1, 2023 if you turned 72 in 2022, you also need to take your 2023 RMD by the end of the year. This is also the deadline if you are otherwise required to take an RMD for 2023.

January 2024

January 15

Individual Filers - Fourth quarter 2023 estimated tax payment due

This represents the final quarterly estimated tax payment due for 2023. If you choose the option to pay 100% of your previous year’s tax liability, any unpaid taxes will be due when you file your 2023 individual tax return by the April 2024 deadline.

January 15

Business - Fourth quarter 2023 estimated tax payment due